Maybe it’s the result of being cooped up for a year, or the sameness the days tend to take on, but lately I’ve surprised myself by seeking out bright hues and unexpected patterns in lieu of my usual all-neutral M.O. It seems I’m not alone, either: A dose of color just feels apt for this particular moment.

When Julie sent me this Brooklyn project a few weeks ago, in the middle of a rather grey stretch of weather, it felt like a refreshing palette-cleanser for the eyes. The century-old townhouse in Bushwick was redone top to bottom for a pair of artists by Leonidas Trampoukis, Eleni Petaloti, and Isabel Sarasa Mene of New York- and Greece-based LOT Office for Architecture. The exterior is painted boldly, and rather fittingly, in a blue hue reminiscent of Matisse’s Blue Nude or Yves Klein; inside are surprising moments of lavender and even silver—a welcome antidote to the expected and monochrome. Take a look.

Photography by Brian W. Ferry, courtesy of LOT Office for Architecture.

Above: The exterior is painted blue all over—fence, waste receptacles, and steps included.
Inside, the architects stripped the three-story, 3000-square-foot space down to its simplest elements. The wooden floors are stained black and the walls and exposed brick painted white for a high-contrast effect.
Above: Inside, the architects stripped the three-story, 3000-square-foot space down to its simplest elements. The wooden floors are stained black and the walls and exposed brick painted white for a high-contrast effect.
Translucent polycarbonate panels connect a few of the rooms for brightness.
Above: Translucent polycarbonate panels connect a few of the rooms for brightness.
Mercury-silver curtains add a surprising backdrop to a sitting area (and emphasize the loading=
Above: Mercury-silver curtains add a surprising backdrop to a sitting area (and emphasize the 11-foot ceilings).
A hall takes on a lavender cast.
Above: A hall takes on a lavender cast.
The design uses an impactful mix of materials: mirrors, painted metal, black-stained wood, and brick.
Above: The design uses an impactful mix of materials: mirrors, painted metal, black-stained wood, and brick.
Dashes of yellow in a bedroom. A built-in sleeping platform beneath the windows keeps the space bright and open.
Above: Dashes of yellow in a bedroom. A built-in sleeping platform beneath the windows keeps the space bright and open.
A petite bath is cloaked all over in salmon pink—even the tiling around the skylight. The only exception: the faucet, a nod to the house&#8
Above: A petite bath is cloaked all over in salmon pink—even the tiling around the skylight. The only exception: the faucet, a nod to the house’s exterior.
Behind the townhouse is a private patio, which LOT built around an existing magnolia tree and otherwise left spare.
Above: Behind the townhouse is a private patio, which LOT built around an existing magnolia tree and otherwise left spare.
A corrugated metal surround &#8
Above: A corrugated metal surround “picks up all color changes throughout the passing of the day,” according to the architects.
Another element of blue: a perforated aluminum curtain that can divide the outdoor space and add extra privacy for the first floor.
Above: Another element of blue: a perforated aluminum curtain that can divide the outdoor space and add extra privacy for the first floor.

More spaces in bold hues:

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