Wood-fired in the rural forest of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Nancy Fuller’s one-of-a-kind ceramic vessels are an ode to her history. Fuller was raised in Scotland and returned to Taiwan, where she was born, to study Mandarin Chinese in 2000. There, Fuller discovered ceramics, and spent seven years traveling between Japan and Taiwan before returning to Scotland where she now works.

Fuller’s products are the result of a hands-on process of creation. She mixes her clay recipes from scratch, builds her pots by hand, and shapes them using a manual kick-wheel. Her pieces then undergo a four day-long firing process in a wood-fired anagama kiln—a piece of equipment that she built herself with the support of the Scottish arts council.

Brought to Japan from China in the fifth century, the anagama kiln is an ancient type of pottery kiln that requires a constant supply of firewood to generate heat, unlike the electric- or gas-fueled kilns used by many modern potters. Wood ash settles on the pieces during the firing process, forming a natural glaze that gives pieces their characteristic earthy appearance.

Photography courtesy of Nancy Fuller Pottery.

Above: Fuller’s anagama kiln, ready for firing.
A pair of humble bowls in Fuller&#8
Above: A pair of humble bowls in Fuller’s studio.
Fuller’s Rock Bowls are available on her website for 3 euros each.
Above: Fuller’s Rock Bowls are available on her website for 320 euros each.

“I can only fire once a year because of the time it takes to build up enough pieces to fill the anagama kiln,” Fuller told Crafts Magazine. “Given the way the world has changed and slowed down in the last year, I wonder if there will be a growing audience for my work.”

Fuller shapes her pieces at her home in Perthshire, then drives them to her kiln in the forest two hours away for firing. Pictured here, the Solace Kame.
Above: Fuller shapes her pieces at her home in Perthshire, then drives them to her kiln in the forest two hours away for firing. Pictured here, the Solace Kame.
The interior of the rock bowl. The characteristic earthy texture of Fuller’s pieces is a result of the anagama firing method.
Above: The interior of the rock bowl. The characteristic earthy texture of Fuller’s pieces is a result of the anagama firing method.
The placement of pots within the anagama kiln distinctly affects the pottery’s appearance. Wood ash settles on the pieces as they are fired and interacts with the minerals in the clay to form a natural ash glaze. Here, the Myvatn Moon Jar, available for loading=
Above: The placement of pots within the anagama kiln distinctly affects the pottery’s appearance. Wood ash settles on the pieces as they are fired and interacts with the minerals in the clay to form a natural ash glaze. Here, the Myvatn Moon Jar, available for 1,000 euros.
The Solace Tsubo, loading=
Above: The Solace Tsubo, 1,800 euros, is currently sold out on Fuller’s website (contact her directly for ordering information).
Fluted Yunomi, or handleless teacups, are 0 euros each.
Above: Fluted Yunomi, or handleless teacups, are 130 euros each.
The Luna Fluted Yunomi XX is 0 euros.
Above: The Luna Fluted Yunomi XX is 180 euros.

Fuller also produces larger fluted bowls. The Fluted Bowl II (180 euros) is out of stock but can be ordered.
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A variety of fluted tableware.
Above: A variety of fluted tableware.

For more one-of-a-kind ceramic pieces:

Object of Desire: Whimsical Painted Plates by a French Ceramicist

Trend Alert: The Chef-Ceramicists Who Make Their Own Tableware

Fabric Effect Ceramics from Society Limonata

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