“The customer is always right—and we like to consider the building our client, too, and respond to its character, mood, and spirit,” says Patrick Williams of Berdoulat. A specialist in lyrical and meticulous period restorations, Patrick, when we first met him in 2015, was living in a mid-19th-century East London apartment that he had entirely freed of its recessed halogen lights, laminate flooring, and other “developer rubbish”: see Reinventing the Past with a Salvage Hunter-Upcycler-Philosopher.

Much has happened since then. Patrick, his wife and business partner, Neri Kamcili, and their daughters, Wren, 8, and Bonnie, 5, now live in Bath, England, and have a portfolio that landed Berdoulat on the House & Garden Top 100 Interior Designers 2020 list. They specialize in working with antiques and salvaged materials, and in addition to their many remodeling projects, are planning to open a shop this spring below their own living quarters in the heart of Bath (go to their online shop for a preview of what’s to come). Their home is part of a cluster of three conjoined structures that includes, in the back, a 19th-century wine and provisions shop that in recent decades was being used as a garage. “It was looking rather sorry for itself,” says Patrick. “Behind a galvanized roller shutter was just a concrete slab and asbestos-lined ceiling. But matchboarded walls gave a clue to it former use, and on further investigation, we found a photograph taken the morning after the Blitz showing the building with six-over-six sashes and a shopfront.” Join us for a look at the muse house it has become—and scroll to the end for a floor plan and glimpse of the building’s past history.

Photography by Berdoulat Studio, unless noted.

A newly installed 90s mirrored door opens to the mews living quarters and kitchen, approximately 300 square feet. Upstairs there are two bedrooms, and the plan is to rent the house for short-term stays (but during the pandemic it&#8
Above: A newly installed 1890s mirrored door opens to the mews living quarters and kitchen, approximately 300 square feet. Upstairs there are two bedrooms, and the plan is to rent the house for short-term stays (but during the pandemic it’s being occupied by a tenant—which meant the additional photos we requested were not possible).

The paneling was created from parts of the garage ceiling and a wall that was removed elsewhere in the building: “none was where it is now,” says Patrick. The insulated floor is reclaimed six-inch pine boards bought on eBay and painted Fired Earth’s Burnt Juniper (“discontinued,” notes Patrick, “but similar to Farrow & Ball’s Mahogany and Edward Bulmer’s London Brown”).

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