After 14 years working as a buyer in the London fashion industry, Ondine Ash decided to take a break and travel. Her time working for a major high street brand had raised a lot of questions about where products come from, so on her return, she reduced her hours to launch Ondine Ash, her own eponymous, ethically-conscious homewares collection inspired by her travels in Japan and South and Central America.

Ash now runs the business from her compact, recently-renovated flat on the first floor of a converted Victorian in London’s Brixton neighborhood. “I did the renovation work on my own, completely naively,” she says. “I think if I knew how much it was going to cost, I probably wouldn’t have started.” Join us on a tour of her vibrant live/work space.

Photography and styling by Anna & Tam.

Above: Ash reintroduced the original features that had been stripped from the converted flat: Wooden floorboards, skirting, and sash windows were all reinstated. She says, “I decided to keep the shell very neutral with white walls and bare, oiled floors,” which allowed her to showcase her finds: “I’m someone who loves a lots of things: vintage furniture, textiles, and houseplants. I’m obsessed with houseplants.”

The sofa in the small living area is from a now-defunct café/vintage shop in Clapham. (“I went in for a cup of tea and left with a three-piece suite of furniture,” she says.) It also functions as a guest bed.

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Above: Ash’s houseplant collection adds greenery and texture.
“I’ve always been drawn to textiles; there’s a lot of indigo, monochrome, and bold, tribal patterns in my collection,” Ash says. Pieces from the collection are glimpsed throughout her home: Hanging above a small armchair is one of Ash&#8
Above: “I’ve always been drawn to textiles; there’s a lot of indigo, monochrome, and bold, tribal patterns in my collection,” Ash says. Pieces from the collection are glimpsed throughout her home: Hanging above a small armchair is one of Ash’s handmade hanging baskets, holding a purple Oxalis plant.
The compact birch-ply kitchen was built by Ash’s uncle, a carpenter. The work surface is protected with Danish oil. The vintage metallic kitchen implements were sourced from antique shops in Ashburton in Devon, Ash&#8
Above: The compact birch-ply kitchen was built by Ash’s uncle, a carpenter. The work surface is protected with Danish oil. The vintage metallic kitchen implements were sourced from antique shops in Ashburton in Devon, Ash’s home country. “Every time I go home, I’ll spend a few hours looking in all the vintage shops. Ashburton has become quite well known for it’s antiques, and it’s so much cheaper than London,” she says.
Open shelves hold vintage copper pots; a hook keeps a colorful tea towel at the ready.
Above: Open shelves hold vintage copper pots; a hook keeps a colorful tea towel at the ready.

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